WordPress Customizer, Selective Refresh and Partials for Multiple Settings

There are several good references about how to set up the Customizer to avoid refreshing the entire page with each change. There’s one here, and there’s some deeper explanation here. What’s not described much is how to map several settings to a single area of the page (called a Partial).

This tutorial will go into updating Partials that use several settings. I assume you have already done the other tutorials.
Continue reading WordPress Customizer, Selective Refresh and Partials for Multiple Settings

/etc/resolv.conf, resolvconf, NetworkManager (and systemd-resolved?) Not Working

I ran some updates, and the name service stopped resolving. My LAN has a local nameserver to resolve domain names for virtual machines.

It turns out the /etc/resolv.conf file was overwritten, and a program called resolvconf had taken it over. resolvconf centralizes updating the resolv.conf file from several different programs that might want to change the file, like NetworkManager, ifup, ifdown, and dhclient.

There are a couple fixes. The one I chose was to replace resolv.conf.
Continue reading /etc/resolv.conf, resolvconf, NetworkManager (and systemd-resolved?) Not Working

WordPress Plugin Update and Install Functions

On the page where they explain how to create tables for your plugin, there’s a link to the register_activation_hook function, which is run when the plugin is activated. However, right in the first section, it says:

Note: Don’t use activation hooks (especially for multisite). Do this instead:

It’s far better to use an upgrade routine fired on admin_init, and handle that per-site, basing it on a stored option.

That links to another page, which repeats the information, but doesn’t tell you how to do this. Here’s one way. Continue reading WordPress Plugin Update and Install Functions

Yet Another Parallax Effect, but This One Wastes Fewer Pixels and Bytes.

Everyone loves the parallax effect, and I’ve been swiping snippets of code to do it for a long time, but never really thinking about it too much. You load it, set some parameters, and that’s it. I was having a little glitch with one, and was tweaking it, and I started to wonder why the effect didn’t just start at one end of my image, and end at the other end.

After all, if I don’t show all the pixels, I’ve “wasted” all those network bytes to load the data, and all the memory to hold the data.

This parallax effect is stingy with network bytes.
Continue reading Yet Another Parallax Effect, but This One Wastes Fewer Pixels and Bytes.