Computer Programming

Yes, a bit specific, but I need to store some links!

Django 1.8 Tutorial - 5. Django Registration Redux

This text is a work in progress. I'm not even done with this part myself.

In doing some digging, I found out that the leading registration app, django-registration, was abandoned. Some time later, django-registration-redux picked up the ball and has maintained it. There's also another alternative django-allauth, which does registration and integrates with social sites.

The instructions for django-registration-redux are pretty good. Just read through them, and consider this tutorial just a slight gloss of what's covered, plus some specifics about our demo app.

Django 1.8 Tutorial - 4. Integrating the Default Login Screens, Adding HTML Email

So, I started implementing the Django provided user login screens yesterday and it was requiring a ton of reading to get the different parts working. It seems so simple, from the outside, but all the configuration options made it seem more difficult than it really is.

In the attached file, a few of the old configs and views have been deleted, but I'm not going to cover that here. Just do diffs between the contents of the attached tgz files to see the differences.

Create a file in your global templates, templates/registration/login.html:

{% extends "base.html" %}

Django 1.8 Tutorial - 3. Adding Account Logins

The previous article cleaned up the UI and made the comment system work more like a comment system, but it has a glaring flaw: you could choose to post as any user. LOLz.

This small modification adds login and logout features. It does it the raw way rather than use the built-in classes, or the django-registration-redux library. This is just a temporary feature, an example to learn authentication.

That said, it does something a little different from what seems to be provided by Django: the login is embedded right in the page, where the form would have been.

Django 1.8 Tutorial

This is a series of tutorials about Django 1.8. I'm a Django newbie and these are, more or less, my learning notes. These differ a little from other tutorials because it's assumed you know how to program, but don't know Django well, and you have worked through other tutorials.

Older tutorials focus on writing code using the "functional style" Django, but these all try to use the classes, and favor generic idioms.

Django 1.8 Tutorial - 2. Polishing the App with Static Files, CSS, JS, etc.

The last article took several hours to write, so I'm going to take a break from writing and editing for a while. These tutorial posts will still happen, but they'll be harder to read.

The previous tutorial created a "comment system", and while it was a reasonable example of using ModelForms and generic View classes, it didn't look like a real comment system. This tutorial polishes the original and makes it more like a real web app.

Here's what it looks like:

It's still not "nice", but it's getting there.

Django 1.8 Tutorial - 1. A Minimal Application Made Using Generic Class Based Views

I'm not a Django expert. I'm a Django novice writing this document to help other novices. There are probably errors, and I welcome corrections.

This is an intermediate level document for people who know how to program, are fairly comfortable with Python, have done one or two Django tutorials, and know the Django file layout, but haven't really "gotten" Django or the generic View classes.

We will create a small web application with all the CRUD operations in around 120 lines. The tutorial emphasizes using the most generic names.

Sources are attached, below.

A Depressing Realization about Tutorials on the Web

I love the people who write tutorials (and fixes) on the web. I owe the vast community of writers so much, because they've taught me so much. It's the reason why I write these short notes, to be found by search engines, to help someone in a small jam.

Syntastic is Fantastic for the Anal Stage

Syntastic checks your syntax when you write your file, and flags all the little mistakes. It works with the pyflakes script. It's amazing.

Web API Design book I'm reading

This is a few years old, but it's a good overview of APIs and some good design patterns. There's a signup page.

Web API Design - Crafting Interfaces that Developers Love

It's good advice and easy reading, but there's what I consider an error in there. Over on page 26, they suggest that it's OK to make a request like "GET /foo/123?method=delete" that will delete the resource.

How to Add a REST API to an Existing Django Project

This is a note I wrote to myself about how to add Django REST Framwork to an existing project. It's in PDF format, for reading. I didn't have the time to create a real tutorial that builds up the API, or produce a really useful API. The intention is just to outline what parts get defined and how they work together.

Django error: Reverse for 'some-name' with arguments '(1,)' and keyword arguments '{}' not found. 0 pattern(s) tried: []

A nice feature of the URL matching rules is that even if you have named arguments in the url(), like so:

 url(r'^items/(?P<pk>[0-9]+)/$', ItemDetailView.as_view(), name='item_detail'),

the system will accept a positional parameter, like so:

{% url 'item_detail' %}

I was thinking that it was going to be particular about named parameters, and I was searching for information about passing named parameters to url, but it wasn't necessary. Once again, misdirected by an error message.

A CSV Reader for UTF-8 Files

I was using the Places to CSV plugin to dump my website visit logs, and needed to ingest this data. The problem was, the fields were in UTF-8... but when I tried to decode each line from str to unicode, the csv library wouldn't do its magic. The fix was to let the csv.reader read in the data as str (no encoding, just bytes), and then decode each field as utf-8, returning a unicode string. These unicode strings were returned as a list, just like csv.reader does.

Django URL Namespaces and Templates... kind of not pretty

So, I shouldn't admit it, but I'm a Django beginner. (I've done a lot of other frameworks, but Django is new to me.) It has a really nice feature to write URLs for you; you don't code URLs into the pages, but use a name to find a URL's associated pattern, and generate based on the pattern. It's really nice.

Python Operator Overloading

I was reading up on Django F() and Q(). I didn't know Python had operator overloading. They call it magic methods.

Magic Methods on Rafe Kettler

There's a pretty good tutorial at Treehouse.

But... a few memories of arguments about operator overloading surfaced, so I had to think about why Java rejected adding the feature to Java.

Are Doctests in Django 1.8 Failing to Run?

I don't know what's up, but I ran some old examples, and it looks like doctests aren't running when I do the " test" (or the one with a settings file).

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